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Religious Radicalization Linked With Socio-Economic Status

20 Mar

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Probably much to Sam Harris’ chagrin, a new study published at Queen Mary University of London found a very weak connection between radicalization and religiosity:

New research from Queen Mary University of London has found youth, wealth, and being in full-time education to be risk factors associated with violent radicalisation. Contrary to popular views – religious practice, health and social inequalities, discrimination, and political engagement showed no links.

he pioneering research assessed population prevalence of sympathies for terrorist acts – a key marker of vulnerability to violent radicalisation – and their relationship with commonly assumed causes of radicalisation. The community study surveyed over 600 men and women of Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Muslim heritage in London and Bradford, aged 18-45.

A small minority of people (2.4%) expressed some sympathy for violent protest and terrorism, whilst over 6% remained neutral – i.e., they did not show sympathies but nor did they condemn such acts. However, sympathy levels increased among those under 20, those in full time education rather than employment, those born in the UK, and high earners (£75,000 per year or more).

Interestingly, migrants and those speaking a language other than English at home, and those who reported having poor physical health, were all less likely to show sympathies for terrorist acts. In addition, those who reported suffering from anxiety and depression were no more likely to display sympathies, provoking some new research questions about the relationship between radicalisation and mental health.

This corroborates the research of Scott Atran.

Also, the last paragraph indeed is interesting, health factors such as anxiety or depression are leading indicators of religiosity. At said link, the main point was to illustrate that women are more religious than men. However, suicide bombers seem to be disproportionately men. If it was religion itself that was responsible for radicalization, then we would expect women to be more radicalized than men. This study might explain why this isn’t so.

Also to note — anecdotally — that youth, wealth, and being in full-time education seems to correlate with another sort of radicalization in the West.

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Posted by on March 20, 2014 in economics/sociology

 

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