RSS

The Stigma Against Mental Illness Is A Result of the Idea of Mind-Body Dualism

25 May

I've become entirely convinced that the stigma against mental illness is a result of Mind-Body dualism. This is basically the idea that our body is just some empty shell and that our mind sort of pilots it. Sort of like driving a car; there's the physical casing of the car yet it only moves ones a driver gets in and starts pushing buttons. Take a look at this article:

“It's an irony,” Kennedy told Gupta, “but we think no stigma towards Gabby and her brain injury, but [Loughner] has a brain injury as well, because clearly his brain was not working properly when he picked up that gun and shot all those people.”

[…]

“If you have diabetes and have a chemical imbalance that you need more insulin, you don't have any question about it. But if you need some more serotonin or dopamine, you need a neurotransmitter, then [people] look at that as something askew, as if the brain isn't a part of the rest of the body.” This double standard, he says, is part of the continuing stigma against mental disorders.

The senator here makes a perfectly valid argument. Why is there no stigma against getting medicine for chemical imbalances like insulin yet when someone has a similar defect of chemicals that just so happen to affect the brain they're called “crazy”?

The brain is a computer, the mind is a program that runs on it. No one is up in arms with the idea of the brain being physical, yet once the necessary relationship is made — that without the brain there's no mind — then people start to huff and haw. Our brains can – and in most cases will be – just as imperfect as any other body part. If I have non-functioning or handicapped legs, then there are certain activities that I simply won't be able to do, like running. If I have a non-functioning or handicapped brain, similarly, there will be certain mental and cognitive tasks that I won't be able to do.

Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on May 25, 2011 in mind-body dualism, psi

 

One response to “The Stigma Against Mental Illness Is A Result of the Idea of Mind-Body Dualism

  1. beowulf2k8

    June 4, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    “The senator here makes a perfectly valid argument. Why is there no stigma against getting medicine for chemical imbalances like insulin yet when someone has a similar defect of chemicals that just so happen to affect the brain they're called 'crazy'?”

    Probably because a chemical imbalance of insulin doesn't make you fly off the handle and kill someone, but a chemical imbalance in the brain might. Unpredictability of a person's behavior is the source of the stigma, not a mind-body dualism. Its the same “stigma” (if you will) that occurs with the use of narcotics. Why do people stigmatize “crack-heads” and use such “invectives” and “insensitive” terms, such “harsh language” that might “offend” someone? Because crack-heads are unpredictable due to being hopped up on crack!

     
 
NeuroLogica Blog

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

Slate Star Codex

SSC DISCORD SERVER AT https://discordapp.com/invite/gpaTCxh ; SCHELLING POINT FOR DISCUSSION IS WED 10 PM EST

Κέλσος

Matthew Ferguson Blogs

The Wandering Scientist

Just another WordPress.com site

NT Blog

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

Euangelion Kata Markon

A blog dedicated to the academic study of the "Gospel According to Mark"

PsyPost

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

PsyBlog

Understand your mind with the science of psychology -

Vridar

Musings on biblical studies, politics, religion, ethics, human nature, tidbits from science

Maximum Entropy

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

atheist, polyamorous skeptics

Criticism is not uncivil

Say..

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

Research Digest

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

Disrupting Dinner Parties

Feminism is for everyone!

My ὑπομνήματα about religion

The New Oxonian

Religion and Culture for the Intellectually Impatient

The Musings of Thomas Verenna

A Biblioblog about imitation, the Biblical Narratives, and the figure of Jesus

%d bloggers like this: